2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 19

For today’s prompt, write an abundant poem. There are so many instances of abundance in the world: Abundant sunshine; abundant happiness; abundant evil; and in November, abundant poetry!

*****

Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at an Abundant Poem:

“forgiveness”

& i try
because i feel
i may need it some day

abundant forgiveness
for the sins
i’ve done intentionally

& unintentionally
for the hurt that spreads
like a cancer

that will eat until
there’s nothing left
to blame

*****

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He believes in forgiveness and moving forward.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

*****

Find more poetic goodies here:

The post 2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 19 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-november-pad-chapbook-challenge-day-19

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Weekly Round-Up: Pathways, Publicity, and Poetry

Every week our editors publish around 10 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place.


wr_iconMake the Journey

When on the path to finishing your novel, you may find yourself bogged down in the middle of the journey. To keep things moving, read Clowns to the Left, Jokers to the Right: What to Do When You’re Stuck in the Middle of Your Novel.

You’ve probably read some great literature in translation without even realizing it. For a better appreciation of literature that’s made the journey from it’s original language to a language you can understand, read 6 Reasons to Read Translated Literature.

If you’re considering writing about your life journey in the form of a memoir, check out The Five Little Secrets of Memoir Writing: A Contrarian POV.

Agents and Opportunities

This week’s new literary agent alert is for Michelle S. Lazurek of WordWise Media Services. She is seeking Christian nonfiction works for adults and picture books for children.

If you want to be a successful author, you need to reach your audience—and that means doing more than simply handing over your brilliant manuscript. Check out Partner with Your Publicist: Why You Need Literary Publicity to find out more.

2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge

Catch up on all of the prompts from this past week.

  • Day 11: Write an “unlucky” poem.
  • Day 12: Write a “transformative” poem.
  • Day 13: Write a poem with the name of a city as the title.
  • Day 14: Write a sonnet or some other traditional form poem, or write an anti-sonnet or anti-traditional form poem.
  • Day 15: Write a poem with the title “Stranger (blank),” replacing the blank with a word or phrase of your choice.
  • Day 16: Write a poem to the world.
  • Day 17: Write a “what I meant to say” poem.

 

The post Weekly Round-Up: Pathways, Publicity, and Poetry appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/there-are-no-rules/weekly-round-pathways-poetry

2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 18

Last night, I asked people on Facebook to share songs for writers, including songs about writing, that make literary references, etc. Not related to today’s prompt, but be sure to share with your poems below if you have a favorite or two.

For today’s prompt, write a good for nothing poem. The poem doesn’t have to be good for nothing, though it’s fine if it is. But maybe it’s about a good for nothing so-and-so, or a good for nothing situation. Or maybe the narrator of your poem has a dark outlook on the world in general.

*****

Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Good for Nothing Poem:

“when you said he was good for nothing”

when you said he was good for nothing
did you mean he was good
for nothing or did you mean
nothing was good for him

or were you just frustrated?

*****

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He loves music in general, so he has a lot of favorite songs for writers. Included in that mix are “Paperback Writer,” by the Beatles; “Army,” by Ben Folds Five; “Holding on to You,” by Terence Trent D’Arby; “The Engine Driver,” by the Decemberists; “Everyday I Write the Book,” by Elvis Costello; “Autobiography,” by Sloan; and “Box Full of Letters,” by Wilco. But there are so many more great songs for writers.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

*****

Find more poetic goodies here:

The post 2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 18 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-november-pad-chapbook-challenge-day-18

IELTS Speaking test in Bangladesh – November 2017

When S took the IELTS Speaking test in Bangladesh, she was asked the following questions:

Speaking testIELTS test in Bangladesh

Interview

– What is your full name?
– Can I see your ID?
– Where are you from?
– Do you work or study?
– What do you do at work?
– Do you enjoy your work?
– Will you continue it in the future?
– Let’s talk about fruit.
– Do you like fruit?
– Did you used to eat fruit as a child? Why?
– What are the benefits of eating fruit?
– Let’s talk about advertisements.
– Did you buy anything after watching an advertisement?
– What kind of advertisements do you like?
– Do you prefer funny or serious ads? Why?

Cue Card

Describe a situation when you arrived early for a meeting or an appointment. Please say

– When and where did it happen?
– Why did you arrive early?
– What did you do while waiting?

Discussion

– Why do you think people are late sometimes?
– Do you think being late for work and being late for a meeting with a friend is the same?
– Do you think sitting idle and doing nothing while you wait is a waste of time?

Related posts:

  1. IELTS Speaking test in Bangladesh – April 2017 Our friend S took the IELTS Speaking test in Bangladesh…
  2. IELTS Speaking test in Canada – August 2017 When R took the IELTS test in Canada she was…
  3. IELTS test in Turkey – July 2017 (Academic Module) Our friend C took the IELTS test in Turkey and…
  4. IELTS Speaking test in Uzbekistan – May 2017 These are the Speaking questions that M remembered after taking…
  5. IELTS Speaking test in Kazakhstan – October 2017 When N took her IELTS Speaking test in Kazakhstan, she…


from IELTS-Blog http://www.ielts-blog.com/recent-ielts-exams/ielts-speaking-test-in-bangladesh-november-2017/

2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 17

I know for poets in the States that we’re getting super close to turkey time; I hope everyone is able to keep poeming through the crazy holiday week. If not, be sure to catch up as you’re able.

For today’s prompt, write a “what I meant to say” poem. As someone who takes his time to consider what to say, I often find myself in this position of knowing what I meant to say…after the moment has passed. If you’ve ever been in that position, here’s your chance to write out what you meant to say.

*****

Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a What I Meant to Say Poem:

“after careful consideration”

after careful consideration
of everything i could possibly say
every defense i could roll out
& excuse that might be plausible

after careful consideration
of how you might react & how
i might react to your reaction
& where it might lead us

after careful consideration
of the profits & losses & whys
& wherefores & whatevers i’ve
decided the best response is

i’m sorry

*****

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He often finds the best responses are variations of “Thank you” and “I’m sorry” and that it never hurts to say “Please.” Of course, there’s usually so much more to say, but he finds excess tends to complicate things.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

*****

Find more poetic goodies here:

The post 2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 17 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-november-pad-chapbook-challenge-day-17

Partner with Your Publicist: Why You Need Literary Publicity

Every author wants his or her book to be a success. Dreams of best-seller lists, grand book tours with sold out speaking engagements, and that coveted interview with Oprah, luxuriate in the backs (and often fronts) of many the writerly mind. But the process of connecting the dots between first draft and The New York Times Bestseller List often escapes even the most ambitious book author.

I’ve been watching the first season of Z: The Beginning of Everything this week, which is an entertaining show about Zelda Sayre, the socialite, writer, and wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald. It has struck me how much publishing has changed since the days of Max Perkins’ golden era—in the early 20th century and prior, a writer’s book-related responsibilities were often to simply write.

Fitzgerald’s manuscript for his first book was rejected and he took a year to redraft and resubmit the work. After publication, he supported the book in a publicity tour by giving readings, but the scale was much smaller than what modern writers do now to enhance their brands. Despite these small forays into the publicity world, he was still most focused on writing (and drinking gin with Zelda), and it’s that fantasy of frantic scribbling and frenetic inspiration that many modern authors still seek to emulate when they embark on a writing career.

In 1920, when Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise was first published, authors were not tasked with the volume of promotional activities that now consume the lives of many successful authors. What has changed in the past century to create such a drastic shift in the lives of writers?

I meet many writers with the romantic notion that handing the manuscript over to an editor is the final step on the path to published glory … but twenty-first century publishing looks a lot different and requires authors to be much more involved in later segments of the book’s life. Writers are focused on creating their stories, and not typically yearning for a radio tour or massive Twitter campaign later, and may not be aware of the time commitment that publicity tours may require of them. Being aware of what supports the book—and expands the brand and thus career of the writer—is an important consideration each author would do well to reflect upon.

The volume of published books has increased dramatically over the past century. Some of this has been a natural evolution, based on population growth and increased levels of education, leading to more writers! Additionally, the advent of indie publishing services has meant that traditional industry gatekeepers can be easily sidestepped, and anyone can publish their brainchild. This is unlike years prior when the traditional publishing model was really the only way to get a book into the world. All of this means marketing and publicity are more important because of the higher levels of competition in the saturated book market … and so, authors need to spend more time to differentiate their masterpiece from the next book on the shelf.


The biggest literary agent database anywhere
is the Guide to Literary Agents. Pick up the
most recent updated edition online at a discount.


It’s important to note that book publicity does not begin after the book is published, but rather starts prior to the on-sale date. However you are going to market your book, it’s wise to begin brainstorming and seeking out support long in advance. Some authors educate themselves on what many best practices are and decide to tackle it on their own. For other authors the publicity process may start with a conversation with the publicist assigned from their publisher. After that, writers often decide to snowball their own and their publisher’s efforts by hiring an outside firm to add man hours to building the brand.

What are typical literary publicity activities? Media coordination for reviews, interviews and other features of your book and your writing is one aspect. Working with bloggers and other non-traditional media members that still provide coverage to books is also a publicity service. Your campaign may also include planning your events (book signings and other speaking engagements). Social media support and management and digital ads and strategy are more marketing-based activities that also get lumped in frequently.

At JKS Communications we often start our work at least four months before a book goes on sale, which means speaking with the authors long before then. Each author has unique goals about what they want to accomplish, which means that they partner in their campaigns differently. For example, one author may want to skew toward radio interviews because she has a good elevator pitch as well as ability to be engaging on air. That may be a larger part of her campaign than for someone else that gets nervous about public speaking and live interviews. For this radio tour component, the author has to commit to giving our team adequate time we can work with to schedule the radio interviews accordingly. The author is using her own time to promote the book, literally. This also means we’ll be communicating with this author about confirming the interviews, which is a higher time commitment for her than for someone who prioritizes the book being reviewed by bloggers (which does not have much author involvement, because that can be handled by the publicity team without any real-time scheduling to communicate about).

A book publicist truly partners with an author to get the attention of the media for the book. We don’t work alone, and authors don’t pay for us to just sort of go into a back room and mix up the magic. Our most successful campaigns involve mutual hard work with an author that remains engaged in his or her campaign, staying in weekly contact (and sometimes daily) and using his or her own time to support the work of the publicity team. We enter into a relationship where we talk about new strategies, who is responding well and who isn’t, and then of course the logistical issues of scheduling. This all can take a lot of time for the author … and that isn’t even including the actual publicity activities they may be engaging in—the interviews, the book signings, the time spent on social media, and more.

For many authors, a successful publicity campaign has tiered goals; some of these objectives might include building a strong brand (and paving the way for more books to come), immediate sales, or, if indie published, eventually getting picked up by a traditional publisher. Whatever your goal may be, take the time to get a good game plan that considers your big picture goals for your book career, and do so at least 6 months before you publish your book in order to give yourself enough time to plan accordingly. Interested in getting down to brass tacks in this endeavor? Look for my next post on How to Prepare for Your Publicity Campaign!


This is a guest post by Sara Wigal. Wigal began her literary career peddling her original illustrated stories at age 6 to her parents’ patient coworkers. She studied literature at the University of California, San Diego as an undergraduate and went on to receive her M.A. in Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College. She’s worked on the agent side, in publishing houses, and with private publicity firms, and she brings her varied perspectives about all aspects of an author’s writing career to the team at JKS as a Senior Publicist. A friend to writers both personally and professionally, she enjoys reading most genres and loves channeling her creativity to spread the news about each wonderful book she encounters. Authors are inspired by her ideas and high-octane energy!

 

 

 


If you’re an agent looking to update your information or an author interested in contributing to the GLA blog or the next edition of the book, contact Writer’s Digest Books Managing Editor Cris Freese at cris.freese@fwmedia.com.

 

The post Partner with Your Publicist: Why You Need Literary Publicity appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/guest-columns/partner-publicist-literary-writing

2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 16

Day 16! It’s all down hill from here.

For today’s prompt, write a poem to the world. Maybe all of your poems are already directed at the world, but for me, this is a first person poem directed at a group of people–maybe everyone in the world, but maybe a certain group of people you know. However, even as I type this prompt, I just want to remind everyone–to please poem nicely (aka, avoid politics and name calling).

*****

Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Poem to the World Poem:

“as the sun shines less each day”

as the sun shines less each day
i can’t help burning bright anyway

no one is going to slow me down
or turn my wide smile into a frown

i’m going to be happy right or wrong
& dance my dance & sing my song

in the growing darkness & bitter cold
no weeping or fretting in my soul

so if the world tells me i should cry
i’ll shout hallelujah & close my eyes

*****

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He is, at heart, an optimist and person who looks for the best in people and situations.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

*****

Find more poetic goodies here:

The post 2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 16 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-november-pad-chapbook-challenge-day-16

IELTS test in the UK – November 2017 (General Training)

Our friend P took the IELTS test in the UK, here is what he remembered:

IELTS test in the UKListening test

Section 1. A conversation about buying camping equipment such as a tent, air mattresses, torch, stove and so on.

Section 2. A research about nurses in 1840’s.

Section 3. Don’t remember.

Section 4. An airport design description.

Reading test

Passage 1. About a zoo, aquarium and parks.

Passage 2. About different types of bottled water such as mineral, sparkling and still. Where it comes from and that it’s more expensive than fuel.

Passage 3. Tickets brochure.

Writing test

Writing task 1 (a letter)

Write a letter to a friend asking for a recipe from his/her country for the party you are organizing. In your letter

– Tell your friend about the party
– Ask for the recipe
– Explain why you need the recipe from his/her country

Writing Task 2 (an essay)

Many people think that important things in life are mostly free or can’t be bought. Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Give your opinion and examples from your own experience.

Speaking test

Interview

– What is your full name?
– Can I see your ID?
– Where are you from?
– Do you work or study?

Cue Card

Talk about a local organisation that employs a lot of people in your area. Please say

– what the organisation is
– what the organisation does
– what you think about the organisation

Discussion

Don’t remember.

Related posts:

  1. IELTS test in Sri Lanka – July 2017 (General Training) When V took the IELTS exam in Sri Lanka, the…
  2. IELTS test in Hungary – October 2017 (General Training) Our friend T took the IELTS test in Hungary and…
  3. IELTS test in India – September 2017 (General Training) When A took the IELTS exam in India the following…
  4. IELTS test in Brazil – July 2017 (General Training) Our kind friend E took the IELTS test in Brazil…
  5. IELTS test in Nepal – August 2017 (General Training) Our friend D took the IELTS test in Nepal and…


from IELTS-Blog http://www.ielts-blog.com/recent-ielts-exams/ielts-test-in-the-uk-november-2017-general-training/

2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 15

We’ve made it to the Bon Jovi Day of the challenge! That is, “we’re half way there.”

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Stranger (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Stranger Danger,” “Stranger Than Fiction,” or “Stranger Things.”

*****

Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Stranger Blank Poem:

“stranger lines”

a dolphin made friends with a unicorn
before turning into a terrifying dragon

the dragon lived in a giant rock cave
& watched television until one day

the unicorn came with a sparkly purse
& told the dragon she could get one

down by the ocean & so the dragon
went & turned back into a dolphin

*****

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He is often inspired by the drawings and stories created by his children, who look at the world from a completely different angle. Currently, there are a lot of pictures of unicorns, dragons, robots, and kaiju.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

*****

Find more poetic goodies here:

The post 2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 15 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.

from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-november-pad-chapbook-challenge-day-15

A clever way to prepare and get Band 8 in IELTS (even if you work full time!)

Today’s post is dedicated to the smashing success of Chetan, a young man from India, who got a high score in IELTS while working full time – 6 or sometimes 7 days a week! This didn’t stop Chetan from getting Band 8 in IELTS, with a perfect 9 in Reading.

Being a very kind and caring person, Chetan quickly responded when we asked him to share his method of preparation, and sent us a number of tips that you, too, can implement to follow his footsteps to a high score.

Band 8 in IELTSChetan said:

“I took IELTS on 30th of September and got an Overall Band Score of 8.

It wasn’t easy for me to get this band as I am working on a very demanding project at work. I used to work 6 days or sometimes 7 days a week for minimum 10 hours, everyday.

Initially I was very stressed about the approaching date of my exam and the least preparation I had done. But I made a decision to handle this issue systematically.

I started devoting time to my study, one hour per day, just 30 days before my exam. I made a timetable and a list of areas to focus on, and divided my time into sections. I also made a timetable for practice tests. Now the only thing I had to do is stick to the timelines.

I used to study during my commuting to and from office, so that I could save time and take my practice tests as per the schedule.

Few of my learning techniques I would like to share with all:

Listening
I listened to the radio everyday, it is convenient because now it’s available in an App. This helped me a great deal to improve my focus while listening. I used to miss information at the beginning but gradually I could catch up and improved. My advice is, choose your own medium of interest. But this exercise is definitely a confidence booster.

Reading
My problem with reading was time management. I used to get Band score of 6.5, while I needed a 7. So I started solving Academic reading tests. I managed to score Band 7 but within the time frame. Because of this, time management in the actual exam became easier for me. I finished the Reading section in 45 min and scored Band 9!

While I feel I was lucky to get the right mix of question types, I evaluated my mistakes during the practice tests and analysed to see if there is any pattern in the failures. This is the most important thing, because you know your own way of thinking better than anyone else. So self evaluation is what I would suggest one should do, to have your own strategies.

Writing
The only issue with writing is you have to have an outside evaluation. This is the most important thing, to get your writing checked by someone. Beside this I read lots of model essays. Get a good book – I got a book from my friend that had around 113 model essays. It helped me a lot.

Speaking
I followed IELTS-Blog.com tests which are shared almost everyday. Used those questions and prepared myself. Also I did some simulation on a website and recorded my session.

These are some of the study methods I had during my preparation which I thought would be helpful to share, because thanks to those who did share their experiences on this blog helped me a great deal in boosting my confidence.

I wish everyone the best of luck.”

Related posts:

  1. IELTS tips from Band 8.5 candidate: “Practice, analyse your mistakes and don’t get nervous” Sai Bhargavi Satti is a lovely young lady from India,…
  2. IELTS Results Competition winners explain how they scored so well (Band 7.5 to 8.5) When we asked the highest scorers of October how they…
  3. Palak got Band 7.5 in IELTS, here is how This post is dedicated to IELTS success of a lovely…
  4. Young man from Nigeria got Band 8 in Academic IELTS – here is how When we asked Oladeji Bamisile, a young man from Nigeria,…
  5. Tejashree got IELTS Band 7.5 despite working 10-hour shifts and studying only at weekends – here’s how Today we are delighted to introduce to you Tejashree Bhat…


from IELTS-Blog http://www.ielts-blog.com/ielts-test-results-competition/ielts-preparation-tips-from-winners/a-clever-way-to-prepare-and-get-band-8-in-ielts-even-if-you-work-full-time/